Home > Our Goals > Goal 4: Uphold and Advocate for Human Rights
A prisoner in Luzira Prison, Uganda, with his reading materials. In
recent years, the prison has undergone a transformation. Through
advocacy and campaigning by organisations like the African
Prisons Project, access to education ranging from basic literacy
to secondary school to vocational training to university degrees
has been established for inmates. The Project is managed by the
Franciscan Missionary Sisters for Africa, a Misean Cara member
organisation. Today, the ethos in Luzira is to keep inmates busy,
which makes the prison safer with fewer violent incidents. This in
turn has created a low rate of repeat offenders. Photo: Lar Boland.

A prisoner in Luzira Prison, Uganda, with his reading materials. In recent years, the prison has undergone a transformation. Through advocacy and campaigning by organisations like the African Prisons Project, access to education ranging from basic literacy to secondary school to vocational training to university degrees has been established for inmates. The Project is managed by the Franciscan Missionary Sisters for Africa, a Misean Cara member organisation. Today, the ethos in Luzira is to keep inmates busy, which makes the prison safer with fewer violent incidents. This in turn has created a low rate of repeat offenders. Photo: Lar Boland.

Why this Goal?

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, grounded in international human rights standards, strives to leave no one behind and elevates the importance of equality and nondiscrimination. It encourages us to integrate human rights into global and national policies in developed and developing countries by increasing accountability at national, regional and global levels.

Throughout the world we are seeing injustices and human rights violations against people who lack the resources to defend their rights effectively.

According to the UN Refugee Agency, the number of refugees and internally displaced people has reached 60 million, its highest level since World War II. The ILO estimates that almost 21 million people are victims of forced labour worldwide – 11.4 million women and girls and 9.5 million men and boys. Of which, there are currently 4.1 million women and girls who have been trafficked for sexual exploitation.*

Violence against women and girls is one of the most prevalent human rights violations in the world with 35% of women worldwide experiencing physical and/or sexual violence in their lifetime.**

Around the world, millions of people suffer the consequences of policies that put business interests ahead of people, whether these are extractive industries, agri-businesses or other large transnational corporations.

With escalating humanitarian crises around the world, Misean Cara seeks transformative change by addressing structural issues at local, national and international levels, while also addressing the issues of rights and accountability.

Misean Cara seeks transformative change by addressing structural issues at local, national and international levels, while also addressing the issues of rights and accountability. Misean Cara also recognises the need for context specific interventions focused on enabling those on the margins of society to raise their voice and defend their rights, in the face of severe human rights violations. This is driven by missionaries’ embedded understanding of contexts and communities, of inequality and weak governance structures, spread across the globe; as well as the opportunity to work together to advocate and campaign to create a global network for citizen participation and to influence government policy.

Key Priorities to Achieve Success

  • Contribute to systemic change with regard to policies that protect and fulfil the rights of people.
  • Increase access to and realisation of basic human rights of people experiencing severe human rights violations.
  • Promote and protect the rights of people who are poor or marginalised by improving awareness of specific rights or entitlements.

*ILO. 2012. Global Estimate of Forced Labour.
**WHO. 2016. Violence against women.